Saturday, August 5, 2017

Book Review: "Almost There"

In her new book, Almost There: Searching for Home in a Life on the Move, Bekah DiFelice gives her testimony through twelve stories of adjustments she and her husband made upon entering military life. She tells of getting married and moving away from home for the first time, of getting used to new homes and communities, of making friends, finding churches, parenting away from the support of extended family, and of trying to discern what's best for everyone involved. And as she tells her story, her testimony, she shares the lessons she learned along the way: lessons in trusting God through it all, lessons in letting Him be her heart's home.

DiFelice has a subtle sense of humor that makes her stories fun to read, yet her gift for words conveys deep truth as well. I found encouragement and gleaned useful insights from every chapter as I enjoyed reading this book, a gift from Tyndale House Publishers, so I could share my opinion with you. Whether or not you are part of a military family or find yourself moving every few years, DiFelice's stories will have something to teach you. I recommend this read!

Friday, August 4, 2017

Book Review: "Gathering the Threads"

The themes that Cindy Woodsmall explored through her latest series are relevant to all people, not unique to the Amish. That's part of what makes The Amish of Summer Grove series so fascinating. Readers will glean great insight as they learn along with Ariana Brenneman.

In the third and final book, Gathering the Threads, Ariana has returned to her home of origin, but her time living away has changed her. She's no longer willing to blindly obey - especially if doing so will hurt her or someone else. She's studying God's Word and clinging to it as the primary authority for her life. Needless to say, her father, fiance, and church leaders are not sure how to handle this. Ariana doesn't want to live in conflict with them, but she must stand up for what is right.

Her switched-at-birth sister of sorts, Skylar Nash, continues to struggle as well. Free to return to the family who raised her, she chooses to stay with her Amish family, living clean and working to discern who she really wants to be. Woodsmall ends each character's story perfectly. I recommend this read.

Waterbrook Multnomah Publishers sent me a complimentary copy in exchange for this review.